taishou-kun:

Hashimoto Okiie 橋本興家 (1899-1993)

Girl and Irises - 1952

(via zuky)

mariposakitten:

hardhatpartycat:

petitedeath:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

nativefemboy:

thartist72:

“In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street. A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.”

powerful Black Science Man

or how tons of blacks and latinos end up in prison for carrying a joint or less worth of weed. 

On a semi-related side note, this is how jury duty works. I am one of those people who have been eagerly waiting for the day I get to serve on a jury and I finally got that call and was so pumped. I wanted to be sure to be unbiased and objective and see things from all view points, look at evidence and make a good choice. Jury duty is such an important task.On the first day they read to us a sample scenerio and then asked us all several questions. The people who answered the questions and used fair critical thought.. those were the people who were removed from the jury. I was the first person kicked out. It was a devistating look at how “fair” a jury can be. I ran into another lawyer on the way out of the court house and she noticed I looked sad and she told me simply. “they arent looking for a fair jury, just one who will get the conviction they want.” It sucked.

THIS ^^^

This makes me very sad because I really want to be on a jury and…

mariposakitten:

hardhatpartycat:

petitedeath:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

nativefemboy:

thartist72:

“In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.”

powerful Black Science Man

or how tons of blacks and latinos end up in prison for carrying a joint or less worth of weed. 

On a semi-related side note, this is how jury duty works. I am one of those people who have been eagerly waiting for the day I get to serve on a jury and I finally got that call and was so pumped. I wanted to be sure to be unbiased and objective and see things from all view points, look at evidence and make a good choice. Jury duty is such an important task.

On the first day they read to us a sample scenerio and then asked us all several questions. The people who answered the questions and used fair critical thought.. those were the people who were removed from the jury. I was the first person kicked out. It was a devistating look at how “fair” a jury can be. I ran into another lawyer on the way out of the court house and she noticed I looked sad and she told me simply. “they arent looking for a fair jury, just one who will get the conviction they want.”
It sucked.

THIS ^^^

This makes me very sad because I really want to be on a jury and…

(via bankuei)

source: thartist72

Originally, in the 20s and 30s, the stereotype of someone who was schizophrenic was the housewife who was sad and withdrawn, and would not do her duties as a housewife; would not do the housework. This was the typical case of schizophrenia. And then, in the 60s, something shifted. The actual criteria for schizophrenia shifted. A lot of psychiatrists and hospitals and police were encountering young, angry black men who were part of the civil rights movement. Who were part of the riots – the uprisings – in the Black Power movement. Who were angry. Who were perceiving a conspiracy of power against them, that was called paranoia. They would see it is white privilege, but it was called paranoia. And so we actually see the diagnositc criteria for schizophrenia change. So now you have anger and paranoia and hostility being included as criteria, whereas 30 years before they hadn’t been. Because the stereotype has changed. So there’s a way in which the DSM and the perspectives of the psychiatrists and the doctors who were giving these diagnoses is thoroughly politically constructed, and thoroughly dependent on the culture and context that they’re within.

Will Hall at Unitarian Church Vancouver Canada March 2012 - Transcript | Madness Radio (via blinko)

for anyone interested in reading more about how schizophrenia moved from being a diagnosis assigned to white, middle-class women to one used to pathologize and institutionalize noncompliant black men in the 1960s, jonathan metzl’s the protest psychosis: how schizophrenia became a black disease is a good place to start. i have a PDF scan of it, too — just ask.

(via onegirlrhumba)

(via so-treu)

source: blinko

Color, Chromophobia, and Colonialism: Some Historical Thoughts

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

I came across a very interesting article recently in regard to western society and the use of color, which explores colonial history and historical context.

But consider this: in the things that we make or buy, color tends to be reined in. While there are some rule-breakers out there, generally speaking, we think that bright colors are acceptable in limited doses, but too much vivid color can seem like an assault on the senses, or we just dismiss it as tacky.

For instance, it would be considered fashionable to wear a bright pink tie, so long as the suit is gray, but in general, we would find it eccentric or odd to wear a bright pink suit with a gray tie. And in terms of home decor, we’ve had plenty of heated debates about how tacky or inconsiderate it is to paint one’s home in a “loud” color, and it’s been reported that the most popular color for home exteriors is white.

Chromophobia is marked, not just by the desire to eradicate color, but also to control and to master its forces. When we do use color, there’s some sense that it needs to be controlled; that there are rules to its use, either in terms of its quantity or its symbolic applications (e.g., don’t paint your dining room blue because it suppresses appetite). Please note that I’m not arguing against color psychology; it’s undeniable that certain colors carry certain cultural assumptions and associations, a fact that has led anthropologist Michael Taussig to argue that color should be considered a manifestation of the sacred.

But what I am arguing is that there is a pervasive idea that color gets us in the gut: it’s seductive, emotional, compelling. Color, in the words of nineteenth-century art theorist Charles Blanc, often “turns the mind from its course, changes the sentiment, swallows the thought.”

According to some art critics, sensory anthropologists, and historians, this mutual attraction and repulsion to color has centuries-old roots, bound up in a colonial past and fears of the unknown.

Michael Taussig has recounted that from the seventeenth century, the British East India Company centered much of its trade on brightly colored, cheap, and dye-fast cotton textiles imported from India. Because of the Calico Acts of 1700 and 1720, which supported the interests of the wool and silk weaving guilds, these textiles could only be imported into England with the proviso that they were destined for export again, generally to the English colonies in the Caribbean or Africa.

These vibrant textiles played a key part in the African trade, and especially in the African slave trade, where British traders would use the textiles to purchase slaves. According to Michael Taussig, these trades are significant not only because they linked chromophilic areas like India and Africa, but also because “color achieved greater conquests than European-instigated violence during the preceding four centuries of the slave trade. The first European slavers, the Portuguese in the fifteenth century, quickly learned that to get slaves they had to trade for slaves with African chiefs and kings, not kidnap them, and they conducted this trade with colored fabrics in lieu of violence.” Ironically, many of these slaves were then put to work in the colonies cultivating plants like indigo, that yielded dyes whose monetary values sometimes surpassed that of sugar.

In England, contemporaries often called the Indian textiles “rags” or “trash” and scorned their bright colors, and in Europe more generally, bright colors were taken as a sign of degeneracy and inferiority. The German writer Goethe famously stated that “Men in a state of nature, uncivilized nations and children, have a great fondness for colors in their utmost brightness,” whereas “people of refinement” avoid vivid colors (or what he called “pathological colors”).

In short, a love of bright color marked one as uncivilized, as not possessing taste, as being “foreign” or other. Color represented the “mythical savage state out of which civilization, the nobility of the human spirit, slowly, heroically, has lifted itself — but back into which it could always slide” (Batchelor, 23).

This danger of descent, of falling into degeneracy, disorientation, and excess, resulted in a valorization of the “generalized white” mentioned above. According to Batchelor, prejudice against color “masks a fear: a fear of contamination and corruption by something that is unknown or appears unknowable,” and the highly minimal, white spaces of contemporary architecture mark an attempt to rationalize and strictly limit an interior, to stop its merging with the world outside.

The “hollow, whited chamber, scraped clean, cleared of any evidence of the grotesque embarrassments of an actual life. No smells, no noises, no colour; no changing from one state to another and the uncertainty that comes with it.”

Read More

You can also read subsequent conversations on this topic at medievalpoc here

(via a-spoon-is-born)

source: medievalpoc

white people make up black attackers: master post.

writeswrongs:

writeswrongs:

Okay I am posting this just because I want to save it and keep it for future reference. There is nothing in here that hasn’t been said before. Please print this out and put it on your damn fridge or in your first aid kits along with a set of pliers to pull your own damn teeth out when you can’t handle saying the same shit 20 times a day to grown white people.

White folks like to do heinous shit and blame it on mysterious generic black men and women.  This isn’t just a dated thing from some long ass time ago, this is a current and normalized trend and here are just some of the biggest stories I could find.

Okay, let’s look at some examples of white people doing shady insane shit and blaming generic black men and women.

okay? Remember Bethany Sorro?

image

Bethany Sorro claimed a black woman threw acid on her face.  Turned out to be a hoax - there was no black woman attacker, she did it to herself.

How about Bryan Douglas Wells, the pizza-delivery man turned bank robber?

image

He told a bank that three black men had tied a bomb under his neck in order to rob a bank.  Turns out he and his white friends were full of shit, but that didn’t stop them from accidentally detonating the bomb and killing him in the process.

Or hey, how bout Susan Smith? 

image

The white woman who murdered her own children and then claimed a black man had done it? Huh, sounds familiar.  Turns out she didn’t really like her own damn kids.

Or Charles Stuart  who killed his own wife n kids and then claimed a generic young black man had enacted this horrific tragedy on his whole damn family?

image

He only got caught because his brother admitted to helping him kill his wife n kids, and up until then the police had booked a slough of young black male suspects in hopes of pinning this shit on someone.

or Ashley Todd, 

image

who, in the midst of the 2008 US presidential election, claimed a black Obama supporter had attacked her in a politically-motivated “mugging.”  Turns out, she was full of shit.

or Philidelphia Police Sgt. Robert Ralston, who claimed a black man shot him in the foot?

image

But actually he admitted to shooting himself in the foot, and had no reason when questioned why.  

Or how about, Conrad Zdzierak, this white man from Ohio who robbed banks:

image

dressed in this black mask:
image

so that he would look like a black dude:

image

and so that, he would hope, a black man would be arrested and charged in his place?

So, can I just say, I and any other folks of color who ain’t got no fucking time for you and your white tears have good cause.  I’ll reserve my damn judgement for when yall aint consistently full of shit.

Okay.  If you know more of these stories please add them and feel free to edit this post.  I came back and added a few based on stories I simply had not noticed.

Thank you, this has been a post.

Oh look one of many new stories to add to this list: 

White babysitter has her white boyfriend rob her employer’s house, blames random black man when it was really her white boyfriend.

(via so-treu)

source: writeswrongs

medievalpoc:

Fiction Week!

image

The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton, Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon

Quashiba, a peasant girl, is about to be made queen because the king believes that she can spin and weave golden things. A tiny creature comes to save her under the condition that she has three chances to guess his name right. (West Indian)

via Goodreads; images via The Art of Leo and Diane Dillon

(via so-treu)

10 Evil Crimes Of The British Empire

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

jhameia:

xtremecaffeine:

thisiseverydayracism:

stay-human:

10. The Boer Concentration Camps

Pitched under the white hot African sun and crawling with flies, the camps were overcrowded, underequipped, and lethally prone to disease outbreaks. Food supplies were virtually non-existent, and the callous guards would dock people’s meager rations for the slightest perceived offense. The result: sickness and death spread like wildfire, killing women by the thousands and children by the tens of thousands. In a single year, 10 percent of the entire Boer population died in the British camps—a figure that gets even worse when you realize it includes 22,000 children.

But the atrocity didn’t stop there. While rounding up the Boers, the British also decided to detain any black Africans they encountered, 20,000 of whom were worked to death in slave labor camps. All told, British policy in the war killed 48,000 civilians.

9. Aden’s Torture Centers

The Aden Emergency was a 1960s scramble to control the once-vital port of Aden in modern Yemen. Although the port had long been under British rule, a nationalist wave sweeping Yemen led to strikes, riots, and a general desire that the Brits leave as soon as possible. A desire the British decided to quell by opening torture centers.

Detainees were stripped naked and kept in refrigerated cells, encouraging frostbite and pneumonia. Guards would stub their cigarettes out on prisoner’s skin and beatings were common. But perhaps worst of all was the sexual humiliation. Locals who had been detained could expect to have their genitals crushed by guards’ hands, or to be forced to sit naked on a metal pole; their weight forcing it into their anus.

8. The Chinese “Resettlement”

In 1950, the Empire had a problem. Armed Communist insurgents were trying to take over Malaya and most of the population seemed willing to let them do so. Reasoning that their forces stood no chance against a hidden army that could call upon the peasants for supplies, the British hit upon an ingenious solution. Rather than fight, they’d simply imprison all the peasants.

Known as “New Villages,” the camps constructed to house Malaya’s poor were heavily fortified and watched over by trigger-happy guards. Inmates were forced to do hard labor in return for scraps of food, and contact with the outside world—including family—was forbidden. Once in a village, you lost all right to freedom and privacy. At night, harsh floodlights flushed out the shadows to stop clandestine meetings. Expressing any political sentiment could get your rations docked.

7. The Amritsar Massacre

On April 13, 1919, thousands of peaceful protesters defied a government order and demonstrated against British rule in Amritsar, India. What happened next was one of the lowest points in British history.

At 4.30pm, troops blocked the exits to the Garden and opened fire on the crowd. They kept firing until they ran out of ammunition. In the space of ten minutes, they killed between 379 and 1,000 protesters and injured another 1,100. A stampede caused a lethal crush by the blocked exits. Over 100 women and children who looked for safety in a well drowned. Rifle fire tore the rest to shreds.

The British public labeled Brigadier Reginald Dyer, the man responsible, a hero and raised £26,000 (around $900,000 in today’s money) for “the man who saved India.”

6. The Cyprus Internment

The big myth of the British Empire is that it nobly withdrew from its colonies when it realized the days of Imperialism were over. Yet one look at Cyprus proves the myth to be just a feel-good fairy tale. Between 1955 and 1959, the British responded to a Cyrpus rebel bombing campaign by rounding up and torturing 3,000 ordinary Cypriots.

The victims of this internment campaign were often held for years without trial and violently abused for being “suspected” terrorists. Detainees received regular beatings, waterboarding, and summary executions. Children as young as 15 had burning hot peppers rubbed in their eyeballs, while others reported being flogged with whips embedded with shards of iron. Those found guilty of rebel sympathies were relocated to London, where a UK opposition party inspection found inmates with their arms broken and jagged scars running across their necks. 

5. Crushing the Iraqi Revolution

In 1920, the newly-formed nation of Iraq was tiring of British rule. Charged with guiding the new state towards independence, the Empire had instead installed puppet leaders. turning the place into a de facto colony. Fed up with their imperial overlords, the Iraqis turned to revolution, only for the British to unleash wave after wave of atrocities against them.

First the RAF conducted nighttime bombing raids on civilian targets. Then they deployed chemical weapons against the fighters, gassing whole groups of them. But the real horrors came in the aftermath, when the victorious British decided to use collective punishment against the offending tribes.

From that point on, any tribe that caused a fuss would have one of its villages randomly annihilated. Specific orders were given to exterminate every living thing within its walls, from animals to rebels to children. Other villages were subject to random searches. If the British found a single weapon, they would burn the place to the ground, destroy the crops, poison wells, and kill livestock. They’d sometimes target weddings to terrorize the population. In short, the British deliberately targeted civilians in a campaign that lasted the better part of half a decade, all because a few Iraqis had dared to ask for their country back.

4. The Partitioning of India

Cyril Radcliffe has the distinction of killing more people with the stroke of a pen than anyone else in history. With almost zero time to prepare himself, Radcliffe was tasked with drawing the border between India and newly-created Pakistan that would split the subcontinent forever along religious lines. It was a tricky task, one that had the potential to cause massive displacement and ethnic violence even if handled carefully. Radcliffe, on the other hand, was asked to make some of the most-important decisions during the course of a single lunch.

The result was a border that made no ethnic or geographical sense. Terrified of being caught on the wrong side, Hindus in modern Pakistan and Muslims in modern India upped sticks and ran. The result was 30 million people trying desperately to escape one country or the other, a situation that quickly spiraled into mind-numbing violence.

Gangs of armed Muslims held up border trains and slaughtered any non-Muslims onboard. Hindu mobs chased and battered Muslim children to death in broad daylight. Houses were ransacked, villages burnt, and half a million people killed. It was a ridiculous waste of life, one that could have been largely avoided simply by giving the unfortunate Cyril Radcliffe enough time to do his job properly.

[or you know, letting the Indians figure shit out instead of a white guy who had never before even been to the subcontinent]

3. The Irish Famine

What started out as an ordinary if brutal famine soon became something more like genocide when London sent the psychopathic Charles Trevelyan to oversee relief work.

A proud Christian who believed the famine was God’s way of punishing the “lazy” Irish, Trevelyan was also a fierce devotee of Adam Smith. How fierce? Well, he passionately felt that government should never, ever interfere with market forces, to the extent that he refused to hand out food to the starving Irish. Instead, he instituted a public works program that forced dying people into hard labor building pointless roads so they could afford to buy grain. The only problem was he refused to control the price of grain, with the result that it skyrocketed beyond what the road builders could afford. Trevelyan thought this would encourage cheap imports. Instead it led to a million people starving to death.

Trevelyan was later officially honored for his “relief work.”

2. The Kenyan Camps

In the 1950s, the people of Kenya decided they wanted their nation back. Fearing a countrywide rebellion, the British rounded up 1.5 million people and placed them in concentration camps. 

Under slogans like “labor and freedom” and other variations on ” Arbeit macht frei,” inmates were worked to death as slave labor filling in mass graves. Random executions were not-uncommon and the use of torture was widespread. Men were anally raped with knives. Women had their breasts mutilated and cut off. Eyes were gouged out and ears cut off and skin lacerated with coiled barbed wire. People were castrated with pliers then sodomized by guards. Interrogation involved stuffing a detainee’s mouth with mud and stamping on his throat until he passed out or died. Survivors were sometimes burned alive.

The official body count is under 2,000, but more reliable estimates place the total dead in the tens or hundreds of thousands. Most of them were civilians or children, detained on vague, trumped-up charges of aiding the rebels. 

1. The Bengal Famine

In 1943, a deadly famine swept the Bengal region of modern East India and Bangladesh. Between one and three million people died in a tragedy that was completely preventable. At the time, the extent of suffering was put down to an incompetent British government too busy dealing with a war to look after its empire properly. But in 2010 a new book came out claiming the lack of famine relief was deliberate and that the deaths of those millions had been intentionally engineered by one man: Winston Churchill.

According to the book, Churchill refused to divert supplies away from already well-supplied British troops, saying the war effort wouldn’t allow it. This in itself wouldn’t be too damning, but at the same time he allegedly blocked American and Canadian ships from delivering aid to India either. Nor would he allow the Indians to help themselves: the colonial government forbade the country from using its own ships or currency reserves to help the starving masses. Meanwhile, London pushed up the price of grain with hugely inflated purchases, making it unaffordable for the dying and destitute. Most-chillingly of all, when the government of Delhi telegrammed to tell him people were dying, Churchill allegedly only replied to ask why Gandhi hadn’t died yet.

Never. Ever. Forget.

#8 affected my family back in the old country.

My British citizenship is a fluke of birth, not a matter of pride.

Fixed the spelling of Malaya. Although this version that it was Malaya’s poor is new, given that the Communist insurgency were racialized specifically as Chinese, so all the Kampung Baru you see are mostly Chinese people. Yes it was mostly poor Malayan-Chinese, but it’s not quite all of Malaya’s poor peasantry like in that description.

Our identification cards are also part of that legacy of resettlement, iirc.

white people and their barbarity and brutality and general savagery. no wonder mofos wanna bury their history.

source: stay-human

The women were lounging about the houses, some cleaning fish, others pounding rice; but they do not care for work, and the little money which they need for buying clothes they can make by selling mats or jungle fruits.

some English lady who spent 5 weeks in Malaya in 1879 that Syed Hussein Alatas quotes in The Myth of the Lazy Native. The joke practically writes itself, but Alatas says it for us: “We may ask the author what is meant by work here? Is cleaning fish and pounding rice not work? Work here means wage earning outside the home. Are making mats and selling fruits not work? It is clear that work here means that activitiy introduced by colonial capitalism. If the ladies became coolies or servants of British planters or firm officials, she would then have considered them as working.”

So when the settler colonials say Indigenous people are lazy, they really mean “they won’t work for us to help us engineer their economy for our benefit”.

(via jhameia)

(via so-treu)

source: jhameia

sun-thief-rai:

13ernkastel:

wire-man:

askamericatheheroyeah:

seriffluoride:

carrying—my—crosses:

doodlee-a:

GUYS, THIS IS IMPORTANT. I’ve been a lifeguard for four years, and I didn’t fully appreciate this until a little kid jumped into the shallow end of the lap pool. He wasn’t flailing. His eyes were wide in panic and h would try and push himself off the bottom, but the water was right over his head. It took me a couple seconds to register what had happened, and fortunately, another swimmer right beside the kid managed to grab him when he saw my reaction.

My mother and I run a water safety non-profit organization and this is one of the things we teach.

In movies someone who is drowning always yells and screams and it’s very dramatic and obvious but in real life you really have to be paying attention

I was on holiday in Egypt when I was 14, and there was a 4-year-old Italian boy I had to save because no-one else even thought he was in trouble. Luckily, the water wasn’t too deep and only came up to my waist, but the kid was so small it covered his head. All he did was gasp for air and angle his head up, and tried kicking off the pool floor while reaching his hands up. I sat him on the edge of the pool in the shallow end and then his mother came over and thanked me.

I didn’t think much of it then, but I saved a life that day.

THIS COULD LITERALLY SAVE A LIFE.

After 2 years of lifeguarding and many more of competitive swimming I can verify this. Drowning signs are eerily quiet. It helps to catch them early. The pool I worked at had a large amount of regular clients. I’d always keep an extra lookout for people I didn’t recognize since I didn’t know their swimming ability. Their face aiming towards the sky is the first thing they’ll almost always do. Especially children.

I remember this well when I drowned

Agreed.

I’ve seen drowning (and I’ve experienced it myself) and it has never been *FLAIL FLAIL “HALP ME”)

You’re too busy trying to get air than to lose it.

I’ve seen the climbing motion and a child angling their head with their mouth open as they kept pushing off the pool’s floor to get air.

Neither screamed for help.

One was my cousin in a neighbor’s pool and I grabbed his arm to pull him to the pool’s seat/wall. He had a death grip on my arm. He was doing the climbing motion.

The child, I walked over to them (bless my height) and grabbed them up and made sure their head was way above water. They also had a death grip on me. Arms and legs wrapped around me, eyes closed and all.

At first I wasn’t really sure they were drowning but I remembered my cousin drowning and even myself and just put two and two together.

At that time, for the child, it was a family pool party and all the adults were too busy playing cards. And I remember other kids staring at the kid drowning confused and looking for an adult. I wasn’t an adult at the time but I was tall and a little mad that none of the adults were paying attention.

And no one seemed to take how serious and fatal it could have been that night.

That kid, once they gathered their devices, made sure to let EVERYONE know I saved their life and that they were, indeed, drowning.

And for myself, I was pushed into the deep end of a pool when I experienced drowning at age six or seven I believe. I remember just trying to find which way was air and getting to it as fast as I could while reaching and grabbing for anything—so whenever I see that same kind of action I don’t even THINK, I just hurry up and help. The same way the person who saved me did.

Whenever I’m around water, especially when kids are around, I’m always just keeping an extra eye on them because apparently this isn’t common knowledge that drowning is a quiet killer.

(Source: fuckyeahforensics, via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

parelima:

by Chirag Bangdel

(via lordbape)

christiancgtomas:

chescaleigh:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Shanesha Taylor was arrested on March 20th by the Scottsdale Police for leaving her children ages 2 and 6 months in her car while she interviewed for a job. Ms. Taylor was homeless and could not access any child care. Her desperation to provide for herself and her children and her lack of options led her to take drastic measures in search of employment. Ms. Taylor needs support & help rather than incarceration and a criminal record that will surely decrease her chances to provide for her children in the future. We ask that Maricopa County use common-sense and provide support for Ms. Taylor and her children rather than punishment.

Shanesha Taylor is still in jail pending a $9,000 bond.

Help drop the child abuse charges against Shanesha Taylor by signing this petition at change.org. Here’s the link: http://www.change.org/petitions/bill-montgomery-drop-the-child-abuse-charges-against-shanesha-taylor?recruiter=13739587&utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition

Don’t just reblog, make sure to sign!

The petition needs 875 more signatures guys!

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

aleyma:

Watanabe Seitei, Bird on Branch Watching Spider, 19th-early 20th (source).

aleyma:

Yoshida Hiroshi, Shizhongshan, 1940 (source).

saucymerbabe:

No one.

No one.

EVER has a right to touch you if you don’t want to be touched.

Not your husband. Not your fiance. Not your boyfriend. Not your partner. Not your friends. Not even your own family.

You are a person and your body is your own. And it’s a privilege if you allow someone to touch it.

A god damn privilege that can be snatched up and you don’t owe anyone a reason but that it’s your body and only YOUR body.

(Source: queenmerbabe, via punwitch)

source: queenmerbabe

You are being lied to about pirates

k-ingsfoil:

spoopyfag:

keyboardwarriorprincess:

takethespearandpuncturetheflesh:

incisiveredneck:

Once they had a ship, the pirates elected their captains, and made all their decisions collectively. They shared their bounty out in what Rediker calls “one of the most egalitarian plans for the disposition of resources to be found anywhere in the 18th century.”

They even took in escaped African slaves and lived with them as equals. The pirates showed “quite clearly – and subversively – that ships did not have to be run in the brutal and oppressive ways of the merchant service and the Royal navy.” This is why they were popular, despite being unproductive thieves.

Oops, turns out piracy is pretty much always a term like terrorist that gets slapped on whatever we don’t like despite being a general reaction to the status quo. And nothing’s really changed.

And when african pirates were captured by the British they were forced into the slave trade.

Horrible Histories taught me about pirates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zwn5K89dE5c

They were generally democratic, disciplined, communal - they even had pensions! If you wanted out of the pirate life, you would be taken to a destination of your choice (anywhere in the world) and given a lump sum to help you with your new life.

interesting

Honor among thieves.

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU YES i’ve spent like two years studying piracy (back when i had time to devote to reading and research) and yes pirates are actually all very interesting and democratic and great

(via a-spoon-is-born)

source: incisiveredneck